Public Art. Amsterdam

BOLD TOREN BOUWMATERIALEN

Strike a Pose – Wafae Ahalouch

Amsterdam, the magic center, art and counterculture 1967-1970

Schip van Slebos

De Appel

Het Bankje

Het Raam

De Oude Kerk

Het Stoepje

Licht

De Brug

De Brug

Ruimtestructuur

Het Zandkasteel en de Amsterdamse Poort

How to Kill a Tree, Edward Clydesdale Thomson

City Cells

Nelson Mandela

Monument tegen Apartheid en Racisme

DOE IETS / DO SOMETHING

Spanje Monument

De Muur

Gedenkteken Steven van Dorpel

De Grote Glijbaan

Yellow Wings

Dolle Mina

Man en Schaap

Hortus Botanicus

Portrait of Jan Pieterszoon Coen, J.L. Vreugde

Anton de Kom

Now, Speak!

Tayouken Piss

Monument Bijlmerramp

Sequin Monument

Mama Aisa

Zonder titel (Twee Schuine Naalden)

Nationaal Monument Slavernijverleden

Monument for Martin Luther King

Gloei!

Voor de Bijen

Industrieel Monument

The Black Archives

Tussentijd

Corned Beef

Sami

Brace for Impact, Node #6

Untitled (You Don’t Have To Be Here)

Staalmanplein

Wegwerphuisje

Groot Landschap

De 7 poorten

Klimmuur

De Kies

Black Waves

Tectona Grandis

Stapeling omlaag

Animaris Rhinoseros Transport

Tuinen van West

De Poort van Constant

Fietstunnel station Amsterdam CS

Noordbeeld

NDSM-Werf

Ontmoetingsplaats

IJ boulevard

ADM monument

De Ceuvel

NDSM-Werf

Observatorium

De Ceuvel

Gedenkteken Ataturk

Twee Beelden

Sunday Seminar Pay Attention Please! curating the city

Official Opening Pay Attention Please!

De Kost en de Baat

Van Eesteren Museum and Aldo van Eyck’s climbing frames

Constructie met I-balken, André Volten

Mirage, Tamás Kaszás

Rembo, Bastienne Kramer

Untitled, Margot Zanstra

Horse Chestnut, Amok Island

2 U’s naar buiten / 2 U’s naar binnen, Carel Visser

Opstandingskerk, Marius Duintjer

Cascoland

WOW Amsterdam

Leonard van Munster, Under Heaven 02

Lex Horn, Concrete relief Hendrik de Keyser

Het Wiel, Jeroen Henneman

Herbert Nouwens, Brettensuite

White Noise

De Wachter

Feestelijke Beelden (festive sculptures)

Your Life is Calling

Untitled

Primum movens ultimum moriens

11 Rue Simon Crubellier

Lady Solid

Opgelichte Stoeptegels

Ode to Mungus, Menhir Tower and Spire

Untitled (Hildo)

The First Turk Immigrant or The Nameless Heroes of The Revolution – Framer Framed

Amsterdam, the Magic Center Art and counterculture 1967-1970, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam

Monument for the White Cube – P/////AKT

Monuments to the Unsung – Framer Framed

wild care, tame neglect – Frankendael Foundation

GET LOST – art route, several artists

Ode to the Bijlmer – CBK Zuidoost

Untitled (You Don’t Have To Be Here) – De Appel

We should have a conversation (2018) – De Appel

Fiep van Bodegom

Roos van Rijswijk

Alma Mathijsen

Massih Hutak

Chris Keulemans

Rashid Novaire

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For the renovation of Stadionplein an artwork by Matthew Derbyshire was realised in dialogue with people from the neighbourhood. Practically at the time of the artwork’s unveiling- and much less to the residents’ approval – the square was also renamed.

For the year 2018, the City of Amsterdam has reserved an extra budget of 1.8 million euro’s for art in public space. The money is to be spent on the renovation of existing artworks but also on the realisation of new ones, one of which is this one at Stadionplein. The renovation of the square, which until recently mainly served as a parking lot, has been the subject of discussion for years. Its new face was extensively debated. But the eventual plan could not do without a large-scale artwork to ‘link the square and the green areas’. Three artists were commissioned to make a sketch design, and Darbyshire’s was selected. The official opening of the artwork is on July 1st2018. The process of development and realisation of the new sculpture provides an interesting insight into the many parties involved in art in public space.

The design – an ‘apartment’ of concrete and bronze furniture- was presented by Darbyshire in 2014. It is the floor plan of a new build in the Noordblok at Stadionplein, with furniture from various periods. 11 Rue Simon Crubellieris named after a fictive address from a book by the French writer Georges Perec. The artist says about his work: “New building projects in cities often lead to gentrification, which is why they are met with such resistance from the original residents. I wanted to give them a dream house, to make them happy and optimistic. This is their home and they can furnish it anyway they want.” Besides the city government (commissioner) and the artist (creator) also the local residents have influenced the final design. On a website they could choose their favourite furniture from a selection made by Darbyshire. The whole ‘apartment’ consists of furniture they picked – except one cabinet selected by the artist himself.

The bronze elements were manufactured in Tiel. As a way of engaging the everyday public, Darbyshire took a number of residents and alderpersons to visit the foundry, where they were given a demonstration of the production process. The city district hopes for the work to function as a meeting place, and the artist too sees the work as an extension of the surrounding apartments: people can gather here and use the furniture to their liking, to chat or to read the newspaper.

During the development and realisation of 11 Rue Simon Crubellier, something else was going on around the square. Not only was it given a new artwork, it was also given a new name: Johan Cruijffplein. Whereas Darbyshire actively involved the residents, the name change was forced upon them without consultation, to which they fiercely objected. According to them the new name does not honour the location and its history. The controversy shows the power struggle that forces residents to give and take (against their will).

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Agenda

March